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Submitted by Patty Canavan (not verified) on 14 May 2019 - 03:52 Permalink

I ordered Miss Cottons conversation course when I was a teenager and thoroughly enjoyed it. That would have been in the early 70s. Wish I had hung on to it!

Submitted by Crownebooks (not verified) on 07 Dec 2018 - 14:06 Permalink

I have a set for sale on Amazon. It's listed under Crownebooks, if anyone is interested.

Submitted by David Bendl (not verified) on 21 Jul 2018 - 16:59 Permalink

Hi Dori,

I have the collection and call sell it.

Please contact me at dbendl@hotmail.com.

Sincerely,

David Bendl

Submitted by Jane (not verified) on 23 Apr 2012 - 02:38 Permalink

Ethel Cotton was my mother-in-law's aunt. Among my mother-in-laws books and art work were the books on the art of conversation and well as Keeping Mentally Alive. She also had artwork by Marian Cunningham with an inscription on the back "From Marion Cunningham to Ethel Cotton. The old Grotto Restaurant, 1928 (?)" Can't remember the date for sure as I gave the picture to my daughter as a gift recently. There were also some other pieces of artwork given to her by various friends. My mother-in-law, Alice Cotton Henry, was certainly a gifted conversationalist as were her siblings. So nice to read this today!
Submitted by Anuhea (not verified) on 15 Jun 2011 - 08:28 Permalink

I found your website when I did a search on Ethel Cotton. I just came across an old letter from my grandmother to my uncle in which she describes going to "Miss Cotton's salon" in San Francisco. My grandmother talks about why she wanted to take the course and described Miss Cotton's home with its view of the Bay.
Submitted by Tony O (not verified) on 09 May 2011 - 17:47 Permalink

Thanks Alfred for your quick response its just a shame my kids wouldn't read them cause they might learn something....haha take care and again thanks Tony O
Submitted by Tony O (not verified) on 09 May 2011 - 16:59 Permalink

Alfred, Just like Diana I have the 1952, 12 lessons in coversation books in xlent condition along with the adventures in conversation booklet and studio talk letter and all the pages for notes and ideas in your conversation untouched. could you please tell me if these could be of any value as i've had them for along time now and my kids ain't interested in them and i think it is just a shame for something so great to just ly in a box in my attic...Please please reply Thank you Tony O.
Submitted by Alfred Armstrong on 01 Sep 2010 - 19:07 Permalink

Diana, it's not worth a huge sum. I see that online booksellers are offering similar sets for around $50-100 but I think these prices are on the high side since I bought mine on eBay for rather less than that.

There's no such thing as a market for old books in general (unless they are much older than the 1800s). Some titles are collected, most are not. And for most titles, condition is all-important, too. Chances are that your books are not worth very much, but it's also possible that there are some real gems amongst them. Have a look at http://used.addall.com and see the range of prices similar books are being offered at, but don't get over excited by high prices. Usually only first editions go for the highest sums and yours are probably not. And identification of first editions for old books is not easy.

I would also check on eBay, as it's a better guide to what people are actually paying for books, rather than what booksellers think they might be worth.

Submitted by Diana T (not verified) on 01 Sep 2010 - 17:54 Permalink

i have the 1966 12 book in the red&gold box is this wroth any thing and is there a market for old books ? I have some real old books from the 1800's
Submitted by Alfred Armstrong on 01 Sep 2010 - 19:07 Permalink

Diana, it's not worth a huge sum. I see that online booksellers are offering similar sets for around $50-100 but I think these prices are on the high side since I bought mine on eBay for rather less than that.

There's no such thing as a market for old books in general (unless they are much older than the 1800s). Some titles are collected, most are not. And for most titles, condition is all-important, too. Chances are that your books are not worth very much, but it's also possible that there are some real gems amongst them. Have a look at http://used.addall.com and see the range of prices similar books are being offered at, but don't get over excited by high prices. Usually only first editions go for the highest sums and yours are probably not. And identification of first editions for old books is not easy.

I would also check on eBay, as it's a better guide to what people are actually paying for books, rather than what booksellers think they might be worth.